Heat From Air

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Here we have collected the answers to the most common questions, so you can quickly and easily find what you need.

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Here we have collected the answers to the most common questions, so you can quickly and easily find what you need.

Air Source Heat Pumps FAQs

Answering your air source heat pump questions, before you ask them

Heat pumps require installation by a trained installer in order to ensure a high level of quality. Please contact our team or find another MCS certified installer.

In many cases, the installation of a heat pump is considered as permitted development provided certain limitations and conditions are met. If you live in a listed building or a conservation area, then further requirements might apply. The requirements vary in each devolved nation, so it’s best to check with your local planning department before proceeding.

For example, in England, air-source heat pumps, the volume of the air source heat pump’s outdoor compressor unit (including housing) must not exceed 0.6 cubic metres. More information for England can be found here.

The installation of a ground source heat pump or a water source heat pump on domestic premises is usually considered to be permitted development, and not needing an application for planning permission. However, it’s best to contact your local council to check here

You should also inform your local district network operator (DNO) prior to installing a heat pump. The DNO is the company responsible for bringing electricity from the network to your home. Your MCS installer can assist you with this and you can find more information in this guidance from the Energy Network Association.

You can find more guidance on registering a heat pump in England, Scotland and Wales on the UK Government website.

The Boiler Upgrade Scheme is a government grant programme for homes in England and Wales. Vouchers of £7,500 are available towards the installation costs of air and ground/water source heat pumps respectively. More information about eligible properties and how are apply can be found here.

Government funded support worth around £5,000 is available for energy saving home improvements like heating and insulation. More information can be found here

Generally, yes. A recent study found that all housing types are suitable for heat pumps. However, in order to ensure the system runs as efficiently as possible, insulation and radiator upgrades may be required.

Heat pumps operate at their most efficient when they distribute a low flow temperature around the heating system. Many domestic properties will already have radiators that are compatible with a heat pump system. In some cases, it may be beneficial to upgrade to larger radiators, in order to run the heat pump as efficiently as possible.

Radiators come in many different shapes and sizes. Often, single panel radiators can be swapped for double or triple panel radiators to increase surface area, without needing to increase the amount of wall area taken up. This can more than triple the heat emitted without taking up more wall space. Radiator upgrades can be a cost-effective way of improving the efficiency of your heat pump and saving on energy bills.

Some wet central heating systems installed in the 1970s have a particular type of piping (called microbore), which has a small internal diameter. This can be problematic when upgrading to a heat pump. The very small pipe diameter means the heat pump cannot transfer water quickly enough to the radiators. If you think you have microbore pipe, speak to your installer when they come to survey your house.

Heat pumps are considered an excellent partner with underfloor heating which works with low flow temperatures. However, retrofitting underfloor heating in existing homes can be practically challenging.

Ultimately, the perceivable noise will depend on the heat pump running conditions, the acoustic environment, and the quality of the external unit.

Ground and water source heat pumps are typically located inside your home in an insulated casing which limits any noise intrusion.

The air source heat pumps outdoor unit typically has Sound Power levels between 55 – 75 dB(A) depending on the manufacture and output. However, some external units operate as low as 40 decibels. For comparison, this is about the same volume as a quiet library! The running noise from the outside unit of an air source heat pump can be described as a low-level background “hum”. MCS installers are required to carry out a noise assessment prior to installation of an air-source heat pump.

The cost of heat pumps varies according to the heat load of your property, the size of heat pump required to heat the home, the heat pump technology chosen and any additional installation requirements, such as radiator upgrades, that might be needed as part of the install. Find out more on our blog page!

A well-designed efficient heat pump system may offer lower or comparable running costs to a natural gas boiler system. Given that the price of natural gas is expected to rise again in future, heat pumps may provide a degree of shielding against future price fluctuations.

For those currently using oil or LPG fuels to heat their homes, a well-designed heat pump system should save you money over a yearly period, provided the system is installed correctly.

How the operating conditions will affect your energy bill will depend on several factors, including:

  • What fuel you are replacing and how much it costs,
  • Your electricity tariff,
  • Which type of heat pump you install and how efficient it is,
  • The design of your central heating system,
  • Your location and its average air or ground temperatures throughout the year.

Yes! A standard heat pump requires a cylinder to store hot water. The cylinder allows the heat pump to gradually heat the water, and store it for the moment it is needed.

Most heat pumps can provide and store water at 55°C, periodically heating up to 60°C or higher for disinfection purposes. Alternatively, some systems use an immersion heater to top up the water to the required temperature.

Boiler cylinders cannot normally be used with a low temperature heat pump, as the coil within the cylinder is not large enough. Therefore, a heat pump cylinder with an appropriately sized coil is usually recommended to ensure that the required hot water temperature is achieved in the most efficient manner.

Again, there are a number of factors that will affect this but for a new-build home, an air source heat pump can be installed in a couple of days.

For a refurbishment, it depends whether your radiators also need replacing, whether your water cylinder needs re-siting, where the outside box will be fitted, etc.

It will also depend on whether you are completely replacing the existing heating system or simply adding a heat pump to work alongside the current heating in a hybrid solution – which more people are doing now.

Heat pumps have been manufactured in the UK for more than a decade now and there has been a lot of investment heavily in R&D to make sure that it is designed specifically for UK conditions.

The system will continue working to maximum efficiency down to -10C and will carry on working to -20C or more, so you can rely on a warm and cosy home even when there is snow on the ground.

Heat pumps require installation by a trained installer in order to ensure a high level of quality. Please contact our team or find another MCS certified installer.

In many cases, the installation of a heat pump is considered as permitted development provided certain limitations and conditions are met. If you live in a listed building or a conservation area, then further requirements might apply. The requirements vary in each devolved nation, so it’s best to check with your local planning department before proceeding.

For example, in England, air-source heat pumps, the volume of the air source heat pump’s outdoor compressor unit (including housing) must not exceed 0.6 cubic metres. More information for England can be found at Planning Portal’s website.

The installation of a ground source heat pump or a water source heat pump on domestic premises is usually considered to be permitted development, and not needing an application for planning permission. However, it’s best to contact your local council and check via Planning Portal’s website.

You should also inform your local district network operator (DNO) prior to installing a heat pump. The DNO is the company responsible for bringing electricity from the network to your home. Your MCS installer can assist you with this and you can find more information in this guidance from the Energy Network Association.

You can find more guidance on registering a heat pump in England, Scotland and Wales on the UK Government website.

The Boiler Upgrade Scheme is a government grant programme for homes in England and Wales. Vouchers of £7,500 are available towards the installation costs of air and ground/water source heat pumps respectively. More information about eligible properties and how are apply can be found on the .gov website.

Government funded support worth around £5,000 is available for energy saving home improvements like heating and insulation. More information can be found on the Home Energy Scotland website.

Generally, yes. A recent study found that all housing types are suitable for heat pumps. However, in order to ensure the system runs as efficiently as possible, insulation and radiator upgrades may be required.

Heat pumps operate at their most efficient when they distribute a low flow temperature around the heating system. Many domestic properties will already have radiators that are compatible with a heat pump system. In some cases, it may be beneficial to upgrade to larger radiators, in order to run the heat pump as efficiently as possible.

Radiators come in many different shapes and sizes. Often, single panel radiators can be swapped for double or triple panel radiators to increase surface area, without needing to increase the amount of wall area taken up. This can more than triple the heat emitted without taking up more wall space. Radiator upgrades can be a cost-effective way of improving the efficiency of your heat pump and saving on energy bills.

Some wet central heating systems installed in the 1970s have a particular type of piping (called microbore), which has a small internal diameter. This can be problematic when upgrading to a heat pump. The very small pipe diameter means the heat pump cannot transfer water quickly enough to the radiators. If you think you have microbore pipe, speak to your installer when they come to survey your house.

Heat pumps are considered an excellent partner with underfloor heating which works with low flow temperatures. However, retrofitting underfloor heating in existing homes can be practically challenging.

Ultimately, the perceivable noise will depend on the heat pump running conditions, the acoustic environment, and the quality of the external unit.

Ground and water source heat pumps are typically located inside your home in an insulated casing which limits any noise intrusion.

The air source heat pumps outdoor unit typically has Sound Power levels between 55 – 75 dB(A) depending on the manufacture and output. However, some external units operate as low as 40 decibels. For comparison, this is about the same volume as a quiet library! The running noise from the outside unit of an air source heat pump can be described as a low-level background “hum”. MCS installers are required to carry out a noise assessment prior to installation of an air-source heat pump.

The cost of heat pumps varies according to the heat load of your property, the size of heat pump required to heat the home, the heat pump technology chosen and any additional installation requirements, such as radiator upgrades, that might be needed as part of the install. Find out more on our blog page!

A well-designed efficient heat pump system may offer lower or comparable running costs to a natural gas boiler system. Given that the price of natural gas is expected to rise again in future, heat pumps may provide a degree of shielding against future price fluctuations.

For those currently using oil or LPG fuels to heat their homes, a well-designed heat pump system should save you money over a yearly period, provided the system is installed correctly.

How the operating conditions will affect your energy bill will depend on several factors, including:

  • What fuel you are replacing and how much it costs,
  • Your electricity tariff,
  • Which type of heat pump you install and how efficient it is,
  • The design of your central heating system,
  • Your location and its average air or ground temperatures throughout the year.

Yes! A standard heat pump requires a cylinder to store hot water. The cylinder allows the heat pump to gradually heat the water, and store it for the moment it is needed.

Most heat pumps can provide and store water at 55°C, periodically heating up to 60°C or higher for disinfection purposes. Alternatively, some systems use an immersion heater to top up the water to the required temperature.

Boiler cylinders cannot normally be used with a low temperature heat pump, as the coil within the cylinder is not large enough. Therefore, a heat pump cylinder with an appropriately sized coil is usually recommended to ensure that the required hot water temperature is achieved in the most efficient manner.

Again, there are a number of factors that will affect this but for a new-build home, an air source heat pump can be installed in a couple of days.

For a refurbishment, it depends whether your radiators also need replacing, whether your water cylinder needs re-siting, where the outside box will be fitted, etc.

It will also depend on whether you are completely replacing the existing heating system or simply adding a heat pump to work alongside the current heating in a hybrid solution – which more people are doing now.

Heat pumps have been manufactured in the UK for more than a decade now and there has been a lot of investment heavily in R&D to make sure that it is designed specifically for UK conditions.

The system will continue working to maximum efficiency down to -10C and will carry on working to -20C or more, so you can rely on a warm and cosy home even when there is snow on the ground.

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    Your Green Future
    Starts Here

    Heat From Air - Air Source Heat Pumps

    Your green future
    starts here...

    Heat From Air - Air Source Heat Pumps

    Your green future
    starts here...

    Heat From Air - Air Source Heat Pumps

    Your Green Future
    Starts Here

    Heat From Air - Air Source Heat Pumps